The pandemic is encouraging healthier behavior, including supplement use, says survey

A recent survey of 13,000 people in 24 countries conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Herbalife Nutrition and the Council for Responsible Nutrition found that 89% of all respondents are taking steps to improve their health.

A recent survey of 13,000 people in 24 countries conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Herbalife Nutrition and the Council for Responsible Nutrition found that 89% of all respondents are taking steps to improve their health. For 81% of those respondents, the pandemic was cited as the reason they decided to become healthier, and these actions have resulted in positive change.

In fact, globally, 56% of respondents can now run or exercise longer without feeling winded, and 48% have even gone down a size or belt notch. Additionally, 53% of global respondents also stated they have more energy throughout the day. Unfortunately, of the 2,000 U.S. respondents included in the survey, only 32% said they were now able to exercise longer without feeling winded, and only 29% said they had gone down a size or belt notch. Compared to respondents globally, only 29% of American stated they had more energy throughout the day.

According to the survey, respondents began their journey to better health by exercising more, cooking and eating healthier foods, or downloading fitness apps. Other “first steps” involved purchasing less junk food, beginning to take walks during their lunch breaks, as well as taking vitamins or other supplements.

“Be it exercising, healthy cooking or including more vitamins and supplements to your routine, for many, the pandemic has provided an opportunity to improve health habits overall,” said Dr. Kent Bradley, MD, MPH, MBA, chief health and nutrition officer, Herbalife Nutrition. “Consistency is key when one commits to a healthy lifestyle.”

Delving further into vitamin and supplement habits, the survey found that they were a priority for many respondents globally, spending $286 every year on average. American respondents spent a little bit more than that: $304 per year on average. While many respondents intend to incorporate more dietary supplements into their diet, only 69% say they feel knowledgeable about the benefits they offer. When it comes to sources of information about supplements, 30% said they were most likely to get information from the internet, media, or social media, while 27% said they would consult their doctor. Wherever they source the information, 77% of respondents say they want to learn more about supplements and their benefits.

“Being well informed about the proper use, as well as benefits of nutritional supplements is critical as supplements can enhance every wellness journey,” said Brian Wommack, senior vice president of CRN.