Swedish Researchers Link Fish Consumption to Improved Intelligence

July 6, 2009

Researchers in Sweden may have discovered a connection between fish consumption and higher intelligence scores among teenage males, according to omega-3 ingredient supplier Ocean Nutrition Canada (ONC; Dartmouth, NS).

Researchers in Sweden may have discovered a connection between fish consumption and higher intelligence scores among teenage males, according to omega-3 ingredient supplier Ocean Nutrition Canada (ONC; Dartmouth, NS).

The study, published in the journal Acta Paediatrica, sampled nearly 4000 Swedish teenage males at age 15 to see if various intelligence scores could be influenced by fish consumption at the age of 18.

Each patient submitted responses about their weekly consumption of fish. According to the study, those who claimed to eat fish at least once a week scored an average of 7% higher in combined intelligence tests than those who did not eat fish at least once a week. The teenagers who claimed to eat fish more than once a week averaged test scores 11% higher than those who did not eat fish at least once a week.

ONC chief sales and marketing officer Jon Getzinger attributes these test results to the consumption of omega-3 EPA/DHA found in oily fish, omega-3 dietary supplements, and omega-3 fortified foods.

-Robby Gardner

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