Sabinsa sends FDA and FTC documentation of adulterated amla ingredient

Sabinsa, in an effort to identify and remove adulterated vitamin C additives from the market, sent documentation to the appropriate government agencies, including FDA and FTC.

Sabinsa (East Windsor, NJ), in an effort to identify and remove adulterated vitamin C additives from the market, sent documentation to the appropriate government agencies, including the U.S Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission. The documents show two independent labs confirmed that an ingredient falsely marketed and sold as vitamin C derived from amla fruit (Emblica officinalis) is actually derived from corn, sugarcane, or other plants, and may be considered adulteration under the Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act. In fact, amla only contains only trace amounts of ascorbic acid. 

“Sabinsa is working to bring such products to the attention of appropriate government agencies, and we urge the industry to exercise caution when purchasing ‘natural’ vitamin C additives and supplements,” said Muhammed Majeed, PhD, founder and chairman of Sabinsa, in a press release. “Absent independent IRMS analysis confirming the authenticity of such materials, they may be adulterated with biosynthetic vitamin C. This is especially a concern with purportedly ‘pure’ amla-based vitamin C additives. Because amla contains only trace amounts of vitamin C, such products are likely adulterated with vitamin C from other sources.”