Novel liquid iron supplement significantly improved iron content in animal study

A recent animal study compared a novel oral liquid iron-containing food supplement called >Your< Iron Syrup to commonly prescribed iron sulphate.

A recent animal study1 compared a novel oral liquid iron-containing food supplement called >Your< Iron Syrup to commonly prescribed iron sulphate. In the study, mice were fed a low-iron diet for 11 weeks to induce a significant decrease in blood hemoglobin and hematocrit, then supplement with either the liquid iron supplement or iron sulphate for two weeks.

Results showed that supplementation with >Your< Iron Syrup significantly improved several markers of iron deficiency, including serum iron concentration, transferrin saturation, and ferritin levels in both male and female mice. Iron sulfate induced a similar response, but did not significantly improve serum iron and serum ferritin in both sexes. However, iron sulphate did significantly increase liver-iron content, while the liquid iron supplement did not.

Iron sulphate is a common preparation to treat iron deficiency, but is associated with poor tolerability. >Your< Iron Syrup, a proprietary formulation containing 14 mg of elemental iron in the form of branded micronised microencapsulated ferric iron, 0.7 mg of vitamin B6, and 1.25 g of vitamin B12 as active ingredients per 5 mL of the product, touts better tolerability and a high level of effectiveness.

Reference

  1. Pirman T et al. “Supplementation with >Your< Iron Syrup corrects iron status in a mouse model of diet-induced iron deficiency.” Biology, vol. 10 (2021): 357