Whey Protein Exhibits Dose-Dependent Effect on Food Intake

October 1, 2010

Researchers in the United Kingdom have observed statistically-significant effects of whey protein on food intake versus control, according to research published at the British Journal of Nutrition on Tuesday.

Researchers in the United Kingdom have observed statistically-significant effects of whey protein on food intake versus control, according to research published at the British Journal of Nutrition on Tuesday.

In a pair of studies, healthy men and women were assigned to drink one of four 400 ml liquids. In the first study, liquids were listed as flavored water (control) or 12.5%, 25% or 50% protein. In the second study, liquids were listed as flavored water or 10%, 20%, or 40% protein. Subjects were then offered an ad libitum meal 90 minutes after supplementation.

Researchers were looking for any effect whey protein might exhibit on food intake (measured as “energy intake” in kilojoules). This measure was checked at baseline; 30, 60, and 90 minutes after loading; right after the test meal, and 30 and 60 minutes after.

In both studies, energy intake was recorded at its highest after control liquids. Energy intake significant decreased following protein supplementation in a dose-dependent manner with the 50% protein liquid resulting in the lowest energy intake at meal time.

“These findings indicate a dose-response effect of protein content of the preload on energy intake at a subsequent meal,” said the study’s author.