Rat Study: Pterostilbene versus Resveratrol

March 18, 2011

Courtesy of a grant from the National Cancer Institute, independent researchers assessed the bioavailability of resveratrol and pterostilbene in the blood plasma of male rats.

Courtesy of a grant from the National Cancer Institute, independent researchers assessed the bioavailability of resveratrol and pterostilbene in the blood plasma of male rats.

Resveratrol and pterostilbene are two compounds with similar pharmacological effects on the human body. Both compounds have been researched for anti-cancer properties.

Via oral gavage, rats were administered 50 mg/kg for resveratrol, 50 mg/kg for pterostilbene, 150 mg/kg for resveratrol, or 168 mg/kg for pterostilbene for 14 days. Two other groups were dosed administered a single dose of 10 mg/kg of resveratrol or 11 mg/kg for pterostilbene.

In assessing blood plasma levels of each compound, researchers concluded that pterostilbene produced higher bioavailability than resveratrol in subjects. “[Pterostilbene’s] oral bioavailability was several-fold greater than the oral bioavailability of resveratrol,” wrote the study’s author.

Resveratrol was documented as 20% bioavailable in blood plasma, while pterostilbene was listed at 80%. Metabolites of the compounds produced differing results, and more research is warranted.

The full results of this study are published in the November 2010 issue of the journal Cancer, Chemotherapy, and Pharmacology.