New Fiber Studies Support Satiety, Increased Calcium Absorption

May 6, 2013

Two new studies, funded by ingredient supplier Tate & Lyle (Chicago), were presented at the American Society for Nutrition Experimental Biology conference in Boston in late April.

New studies support fiber’s positive effects on satiety and calcium absorption. Two new studies, funded by ingredient supplier Tate & Lyle (Chicago), were presented at the American Society for Nutrition Experimental Biology conference in Boston in late April.

The first study on satiety was a double-blind, randomized, crossover trail on 41 healthy adults. Researchers looked at the effects of a soluble fiber dextrin (SFD)-derived from tapioca or corn-versus a maltodextrin control. Subjects were given lunch with a test beverage containing 10 or 20 g of tapioca SFD or the maltodextrin control beverage, followed by a snack 2.5 hours later. Compared to those on the control beverage, subjects who consumed the 20-g SFD beverage reported feeling fuller and less hungry, and less of a desire to eat, 3 to 8.5 hours after drinking the beverage. The company posits that the fact that SFD is slowly digested leads to delayed effects on appetite.

The second study presented at the conference looked at the effects of the company’s Promitor soluble corn fiber (SCF) on fecal microbiota in the gut in relation to calcium absorption. The study was performed on 24 male and female adolescents because this population needs adequate calcium for bone growth and development. Subjects who consumed 12 g/day of SCF versus control saw a 12% increase in calcium absorption. The researchers suggest that the increased calcium absorption was related to significant increases in specific beneficial bacteria strains-Bacteriocides, Alistipes, Butyricicoccus, Oscillibacter, and Dialister.

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