Lower Omega-3 Index means higher chance of peripheral artery disease, says new study

March 25, 2019

Researchers determined that an absolute decrease in 1% of Omega-3 Index was associated with 39% greater odds of PAD.

A recent study published in Lipids has found a correlation between low Omega-3 Index and peripheral artery disease (PAD). PAD is a disease that effects the blood vessels outside of the heart and brain. In the study, blood was tested on a cross-section of 179 vascular surgery outpatients; 145 with PAD, and 34 control. Results showed that patients with PAD has a lower mean Omega-3 Index, lower ratio of EPA to omega-6 polyunsaturated fat arachidonic acids, and a greater mean total saturated fat. Researchers determined that an absolute decrease in 1% of Omega-3 Index was associated with 39% greater odds of PAD.

“It is likely that the lower inflammatory burden associated with a higher Omega-3 Index may be part of the explanation for these results,” said Bill Harris, PhD, one of the study’s authors. “Whether long-term use of omega-3 supplements and/or increased consumption of oily fish could prevent the development of PAD should be examined in future studies.”