Lonza ResistAid Exhibits Antigen-Specific Immune Response

October 26, 2010

A proprietary larch tree extract appears to enhance the body’s immune response specific to pneumonia vaccine, according to new research published in Nutrition Journal.

A proprietary larch tree extract appears to enhance the body’s immune response specific to pneumonia vaccine, according to new research published in Nutrition Journal.

Previous science on the arabinogalactan extract has demonstrated that it has an immunostimulatory effect, but a team of California researchers sought to determine whether the ingredient could increase antibody response to pneumonia vaccine rather than the entire non-specific immune system.

In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study, 45 healthy adults were assigned to 4.5 g of a proprietary arabinogalactan product (ResistAid manufactured by Lonza) or placebo for 72 days. After 30 days, subjects were vaccinated for Streptococcus pneumonia. Specific immune response was measured on the following day, day 51, and day 72 via pneumococcal immunoglubin A (IgA) antibody counts and salivary immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody counts. Non-specific immune response was measured via white blood cell counts, inflammatory cytokines, and complement C3 and C4, proteins that have an influence on the immune system.

At days 51 and 72, IgG levels increased after vaccination in both groups, but significantly more so with arabinogalactan treatment for two of the seven measured antibodies (18C and 23F). No effect of the treatment was observed on IgA, white blood cell count, inflammatory cytokines, or the complement system.

“The results of this pilot study suggest that the arabinogalactan preparation had a selective immunostimulating effect on acquired or adaptive immunity without any clinically significant effects on [non-specific immune markers]” wrote the study’s authors. “Thus, it is possible that rather than acting as a general immunostimulant, arabinogalactan acted in a specific manner.”

The researchers indicated that larger studies are needed to make up for any confounding variables in this pilot study.

For more information on the ingredient, visit Lonza.

To access the full study, visit Nutrition Journal.