Canola Oil May Reduce Risk of Breast Cancer

September 23, 2010

Canola oil may inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells, according to research published in the September issue of the journal Lipids. Researchers at North Dakota State University conducted in vitro and in vivo tests to assess the theory.

Canola oil may inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells, according to research published in the September issue of the journal Lipids.

Researchers at North Dakota State University conducted in vitro and in vivo tests to assess the theory.

In the in vitro trial, T47D and MCF-7 cancer cells were cultured and then treated with canola oil and two common anti-cancer drugs: tamoxifen and cerulenin. Measures used were cancer cell growth and activity of caspase-3 and p53 (proteins believed to promote cancer cell death and commonly used for assessing breast cancer treatment).

Cancer cells treated with canola oil showed less cell growth and increased activity of the two proteins, leaving researchers to conclude that canola oil and the drugs showed 'synergistic' effects in inhibiting cancer cell growth.

In the in vivo trial, 42 female Sprague-Dawley rats were chemically-induced with mammary tumors and assigned to corn or canola diets. Compared to the corn group, researchers noted a higher survival rate and decreased cancer cell growth in the canola group.

'The results suggest that canola oil may have inhibitory effects on breast cancer cell growth, and warrants further investigation of synergistic effects of canola oil with anti-cancer drugs,' wrote the study...s author.

An estimated 180,000 diagnoses of breast cancer occur in the United States each year.

To read the study abstract, click here.