True Grace, Rodale Institute partner to research impact of regenerative agriculture on nutrition

The research will study how regenerative organic agriculture impacts nutrient density in crops while also contributing to climate mitigation through sequestration of atmospheric CO2 in the soil. 

True Grace (Pewaukee, WI) launched a new program in partnership with Rodale Institute to support scientific research—known as the Vegetable Systems Trial—that examines how soil health and farm-management practices impact the health of humans and the planet. The research will, more specifically, study how regenerative organic agriculture impacts nutrient density in crops while also contributing to climate mitigation through sequestration of atmospheric CO2 in the soil. 

“We believe regenerative practices are the key to a healthy future, not only for the planet and human health, but the livelihoods of American farmers,” said Brian Hall, CEO of True Grace, in a press release. “We’re honored to partner with Rodale Institute as one of the leading institutions advancing the regenerative organic movement. We see a clear connection between the health of our soil, our personal health and the planet, and more research is needed to scientifically validate this. At the same time, there is a significant need for more organic and regenerative ingredients and produce, and farmers urgently need on-the-ground support to begin making a transition. We’re excited to lock hand-in-hand to help them achieve this and together create a more sustainable future for generations to come.”

The partnership will also provide funding that will support farmers who are interested in transitioning their land to organic systems. The funds from True Grace will help Rodale Institute’s Organic Consulting program to provide 300 hours of consulting services to farmers throughout Wisconsin, enough to begin transitioning approximately 30 farms to a regenerative organic model.