Soy Intake Reduces Breast Cancer Risk in another Population Study

September 28, 2010

Several large population studies have shown soy intake to accompany reduced risks of breast cancer in women, but a team of Korean researchers sought to conduct another study, stating that previous findings have often been “inconsistent.” The results were published in the September issue of the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Several large population studies have shown soy intake to accompany reduced risks of breast cancer in women, but a team of Korean researchers sought to conduct another study, stating that previous findings have often been “inconsistent.” The results were published in the September issue of the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Breast cancer patients (n=358) and age-matched control subjects with no history of breast cancer (n=360) were recruited to participate in a 103-item food frequency questionnaire.

Estimated intake of soy and soy isoflavones was recorded at 76.5 g per day and 15 mg per day, respectively.

The diets of breast cancer patients were determined to be lower in total soy, tofu, fermented soy paste, soy milk, and sprouts, compared to the control group.

“Our findings suggest that a high intake of soy is inversely associated with breast cancer risk mostly among postmenopausal women,” wrote the study’s lead author. But the author also noted varying conclusions depending on the type of soy food and the hormone receptor status of the subject (lowered hormones from breast cancer could influence the effect of soy). “Therefore, further large-scale investigations with stratification by factors that modify the soy-breast cancer association are needed to understand the relationship between soy intake and breast cancer,” added the author.

To read the full study, click here.