Probiotic Reduces Healthcare-Induced Colitis in Mice

November 14, 2012

Animal research suggests that a patented probiotic can aid against Clostridium difficile-induced infection, a condition characterized by colitis and diarrhea.

Animal research suggests that a patented probiotic can aid against Clostridium difficile-induced infection, a condition characterized by colitis and diarrhea.

Clostridium difficile (C. diff) is an inflammatory bacterium, and old age and prolonged antibiotic use increase one’s risk of exposure to C. diff. But new research from Ganeden Biotech (Cleveland) suggests that its GanedenBC30 probiotic may lessen the severity of this healthcare-induced problem.

Mice inoculated with C. diff were treated with antibiotics followed by a placebo (saline) or GanedenBC30. One symptom of the bacterial infection was reduced stool consistency. By day 17, 88.9% of probiotic-consuming mice experienced a return to normal stool consistency, whereas none of the placebo-consuming mice had normal stool. The GanedenBC30 probiotic also reduced recurrence of colitis.

The mice study supports previous research suggesting support with Ganeden’s probiotic.

“Currently, antibiotics are the primary weapon in the arsenal to fight C. diff,” said David Keller, PhD, Ganeden vice president of scientific operations.“These findings show that the probiotic GanedenBC30 may provide an alternative.”

The newest study is now published in the journal Gut Pathogens.