FDA to Ban BPA from Infant Formula

June 15, 2012

The agency’s action follows a petition from Congressman Ed Markey (D-MA), who argued that most of the industry has transitioned away from the chemical.

FDA is initiating the process to end BPA use in infant formula packaging. The agency’s action follows a petition from Congressman Ed Markey (D-MA), who argued that most of the industry no longer uses the chemical in these products, anyway.

Animal studies have suggested a variety of potential adverse health effects from exposure to bisphenol-A (BPA), but FDA says it is unsure that human exposure levels are high enough to cause significant harm.

Now, FDA is required to publish the petition within 90 days, allow and review comments, and propose a final rule to outlaw BPA in the packaging, according to a statement from Congressman Markey.

In March 2012, Markey filed similar petitions against BPA’s use in small reusable household food and beverage containers, baby and toddler food packaging, and canned food packaging. Each of these petitions was turned down due to either industry opposition or inconclusive evidence that the industries have transitioned away from BPA.

Earlier this year the Natural Resources Defense Council submitted a petition to ban BPA from human food packaging entirely. FDA denied that petition.