Cracking the Mystery of Quercetin

June 29, 2009

A recent study on the effects of quercetin proves the plant pigment found in red wine and apples is still of scientific interest.

A recent study on the effects of quercetin proves the plant pigment found in red wine and apples is still of scientific interest. Previously researched for its potential to treat health conditions like cancer or child asthma, quercetin is now being evaluated as a potential athletic performance booster, according to U.S. News & World Report.

The International Journal of Sports Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism published a study this week that tested the effect quercetin had on cycling performance for 12 patients over seven days. Some performance results (notably endurance times) leaned in favor of those patients who took quercetin, but there is still speculation surrounding its use.

The American Cancer Society states that there is no reliable proof that quercetin can treat or prevent cancer. ConsumerLab.com, involved in a 1999 study of the supplement, acknowledges that it “may be helpful for chronic non-bacterial prostatitis,” but that it should be avoided by pregnant women and in high doses.

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