ConsumerLab Responds to AHPA’s Valerian Critique

December 2, 2010

ConsumerLab.com has responded to criticisms made last week by the American Herbal Products Association (AHPA; Silver Spring, MD) about ConsumerLab’s recent report on valerian root (Valeriana officinalis), which found that only 22% of valerian root products it tested passed quality tests.

ConsumerLab.com has responded to criticisms made last week by the American Herbal Products Association (AHPA; Silver Spring, MD) about ConsumerLab’s recent report on valerian root (Valeriana officinalis), which found that only 22% of valerian root products it tested passed quality tests.

In its critique, AHPA questioned ConsumerLab’s 0.17% valerenic acid testing threshold, which AHPA claims was erroneously applied for all forms of valerian products, including those made from whole, dried valarien root and those made from dried valerian root in cut form.

AHPA said that in cut form, valerian should adhere to a 0.10% valerenic acid testing standard-and that if this threshold had been applied, two additional products would have passed ConsumerLab’s testing.

In its response to AHPA, ConsumerLab stated, “The criteria used by ConsumerLab.com represents the total valerenic acids as the sum of three compounds…The 0.10% requirement…is based on the sum of only two compounds. Contrary to AHPA’s press release, calculating results based on these two compounds and using the lower minimum, the failed products still would not pass testing.”

ConsumerLab also addressed AHPA’s critiques over its testing for California Prop 65 lead contamination.

“The AHPA trade group has overlooked key facts that clearly support ConsumerLab.com’s findings and conclusions,” stated Tod Cooperman, MD, ConsumerLab president.

Read ConsumerLab’s full response to AHPA here.

Read more about AHPA’s response here.

Read about ConsumerLab’s original valerian report here.

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