Bilberon bilberry ingredient patented for improving stiff neck and shoulders related to eye strain

Squinting and hunching over as a result of the eyestrain of looking at LED and blue light from visual display terminals like computers, TVs, and smartphones can also lead to stiff neck and shoulders.

Bilberon, a proprietary branded bilberry extract (Vaccinium myrtillus), has gained a U.S. patent (No. US 11,154,581) for improving stiff neck and shoulders related to eye strain, such as from digital screens. The ingredient was created by Tokiwa Phytochemical Company, Ltd. (Tokyo), and is distributed in North America by Maypro (Purchase, NY).

Squinting and hunching over as a result of the eyestrain of looking at LED and blue light from visual display terminals like computers, TVs, and smartphones can also lead to stiff neck and shoulders. The companies say that a 2017 study1 on Bilberon showed that the ingredient not only showed benefits for eye fatigue, eye dryness, and eye focus but also helped improve neck and shoulder stiffness. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study administered 160 mg/day of Bilberon extract for six weeks, or a placebo.

“As to the mechanism of action,” the companies said in a press release, “the naturally occurring antioxidative ingredients in bilberry—anthocyanins—are the primary drivers in Bilberon’s ability to improve focused vision, reduce eye fatigue, relieve eye dryness, and alleviate neck and shoulder pain.”

“It’s true that Americans are sitting in front of digital displays more now than ever before—working, streaming, and even gaming,” added Denis Alimonti, director of Maypro’s U.S. Nutrition Division, in a press release. “The eSports category is proving interesting, with manufacturers interested in Bilberon as an ingredient that may help gamers optimize performance.”

Bilberon is standardized to 36%-or-higher anthocyanin content and is dairy free, gluten free, kosher, halal, and non-GMO.

Reference

  1. Liang T et al. “Effect of a bilberry extract (Bilberon)-containing diet on the improvement of eye fatigue-related symptoms: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group comparison study.” Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol. 45, no. 9 (January 2017): 1523-1534