Study Finds Krill Oil Inhibits “Fat-Signaling Markers”

February 11, 2011

A study comparing krill oil with fish oil has found that krill may effectively influence the human endocannabinoid system in obese persons, which could influence physiological processes like mood and appetite.

A study comparing krill oil with fish oil has found that krill may effectively influence the human endocannabinoid (EC) system in obese persons, which could influence physiological processes like mood and appetite.

Normal, overweight, and obese subjects given 2 grams of krill oil, menhaden fish oil, or olive oil daily for four weeks, and EC plasma levels were measured.

Krill oil ingredient supplier Aker Biomarine (Oslo, Norway) announced the results earlier this week, noting that increases in ECs were linked to a “relatively low dose” of 309 mg of the omega-3s EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid)/DHA (docosahexaenoic acid).

Previous research indicates that obese persons have elevated blood levels of the “fat-signaling markers,” according to Aker Biomarine.

“This is an important finding confirming previous outcomes with krill oil in obese animals,” said Nils Hoem, PhD, a chief scientist at the company. “Helping normalize endocannabanoid levels in obese subjects may help address potential long-term health issues, including metabolic syndrome, though these are preliminary findings and additional research is necessary to draw solid conclusions.”

Results of this study on krill oil and fat-signaling markers is available have been published in the journal Nutrition & Metabolism.