Rat Study Demonstrates Krill’s Lipid Metabolism Effect

March 31, 2011

A research group based in Italy has found that krill oil may be more efficient in activating fat metabolism than fish oil.

A research group based in Italy has found that krill oil may be more efficient in activating fat metabolism than fish oil. Their research has been published in the Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition.

Krill oil supplier Aker Biomarine ASA (Oslo, Norway) broke the news to Nutritional Outlook, noting that the findings confirm previous work on animal models and obesity.

Rats were fed diets consisting of 2.5% krill oil, 2.5% fish oil, or control treatment. Enzymes related to fat metabolism were measured; according to Aker Biomarine, although fish oil and krill oil both encouraged beneficial responses, the effect of krill oil was “more pronounced”-especially during shorter feeding periods of two to three weeks.

Rats on diets of krill oil showed 20% fewer triglycerides and 33% less cholesterol compared to control. Lower levels of improvements were observed with fish oil (10% fewer triglycerides and 21% reduced cholesterol compared to control).

“These studies confirm the beneficial effects of krill oil on liver lipid levels that we have previously seen in two different animal models of obesity,” said Kjetil Berge, PhD, Aker Biomarine director of research and development. “The study elucidated the mechanism behind the beneficial effects of omega-3 supplementation, by demonstrating regulation of lipid synthesizing enzymes. This study gives us a foundation to study cellular mitochondrial processes in more detail in future studies.”

Krill oil is marketed as a marine ingredient high in natural levels of the omega-3s DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid).

Aker Biomarine is currently the only krill oil supplier with Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certification for sustainable fishing practices.