Multi-enzyme blend tested and validated using new in vitro model that simulates digestion

Results showed that the enzyme blend more effectively released nutrients from a balanced meal compared to control conditions, which relied solely on endogenous enzymes similar to those already present in the human digestive system.

A recent clinical trial published in Food Chemistry found that use of enzymes may help improve digestion. The researchers used an in vitro model of aging called Infogest, which is a protocol that models salivary, gastric, and intestinal digestion with specific simulated digestion fluids, pH conditions, and enzymes to reflect human digestive physiology. Researchers used this model to test the hydrolytic efficacy of a blend of six fungal enzymes from Bio-Cat Inc. (Troy, VA) that included microbial proteases, lipase, amylase, and glucoamylase.

Results showed that the enzyme blend more effectively released nutrients from a balanced meal compared to control conditions, which relied solely on endogenous enzymes similar to those already present in the human digestive system. There was also enhanced digestion in the acidic gastric phase, confirming that the microbial enzymes are naturally acid-tolerant without encapsulation.

When the protocol was modified to model the decline in digestive function associated with advancing age and antacid use, the enzyme blend was able to restore and improve macronutrient digestion and nutrient release under both models.

Reference

  1. Garvey SM et al. “Fungal digestive enzymes promote macronutrient hydrolysis in the Infogest static in vitro simulation of digestion.” Food Chemistry, vol. 386 (2022), https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2022.132777