Growing body of evidence suggests association between vitamin D levels and healthy blood sugar

April 3, 2019

Two recently published studies show that there may be a link between vitamin D levels and blood glucose.

Two recently published studies show that there may be a link between vitamin D levels and blood glucose. In one cross-sectional study published in Menopause1, researchers took fasting blood samples from 680 women between the ages of 35 and 74 to determine vitamin D and glucose levels. Results showed that lower serum vitamin D concentrations were associated with higher blood glucose levels.

Another study published in Clinica Chimica Acta2 evaluated 180 subjects (90 controls, and 90 type II diabetes patients) between 30 and 50 years of age for serum vitamin D, fasting plasma insulin, fasting blood glucose, and insulin resistance/sensitivity. Results showed that vitamin D deficiency was present in 40% of controls and 70% of type II diabetes patients. Researchers determined that subjects with severe vitamin D deficiency ( less than 10 ng/ml) were 39 times more likely of having type II diabetes, and those with moderate deficiency (10-19 ng/ml) and insufficiency (20-29 ng/ml) were 16 times and 13 times more likely to have type II diabetes, respectively.
 

Disclosures:

Two recently published studies show that there may be a link between vitamin D levels and blood glucose.

References:

  1. Valladares T et al. “Higher serum levels of vitamin D are associated with lower blood glucose levels.” Menopause, Published online ahead of print January 1, 2019
  2. Dhas Y et al. “Association of vitamin D deficiency with insulin resistance in middle-aged type 2 diabetics.” Clinica Chimic Acta, Published online ahead of print February 14, 2019