CRN submits comments to USDA and HHS on the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee’s scientific report

The Council for Responsible Nutrition has submitted comments to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in response to the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee’s final scientific report.

The Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN; Washington, D.C.) has submitted comments to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in response to the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee’s final scientific report to inform the development of the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The trade organization issued a statement upon the report’s release, encouraged by the committee’s acknowledgement of the appropriate use of dietary supplements during pregnancy.

CRN’s written comments to USDA and HHS offer more detailed recommendations for the development of the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines of Americans, specifically with regard to how dietary supplements may be more broadly incorporated into the guidelines. For example, the committee’s report determined that the U.S. population one year of age and older did not meet recommended intakes of vitamins A, C, D, E, and K, calcium, dietary fiber, potassium, magnesium, and choline. In addition, USDA Food Patterns do not meet nutrient adequacy goals for iron, vitamin D, vitamin E, and choline. Vitamin D is considered a nutrient of public health concern for the entire population, but so few food sources are available, therefore USDA Food Patterns do provide recommended amounts of vitamin D. Therefore, argues CRN, the Dietary Guidelines should emphasize supplementation of vitamin D, and other nutrients such as vitamin E and choline, to meet recommended intakes.

CRN summarizes its comments as follows: “CRN recommends that the Dietary Guidelines highlight special nutrient needs at each life stage and include strategies to meet nutrient intake targets that incorporate dietary supplements, particularly when USDA Food Patterns are unable to provide recommended intakes of underconsumed nutrients, especially those of public health concern. Further, the Dietary Guidelines should reinforce current expert recommendations regarding nutrient supplementation during pregnancy, lactation, and birth to 24 months life stages. For these life stages, it is also important that the Dietary Guidelines recommend communication with a healthcare practitioner about specific nutritional needs.”