Capsanthin ingredient alleviates symptoms of dry eyes and reduced oxidative stress in recent study

Results showed that the ingredient significantly decreased intraocular pressure, increased tear break-up time and volume, and decreased corneal inflammation, leading to the stabilization of the rats’ ocular surface.

A recent animal study published in the Journal of Food Biochemistry1 found that supplementation with Capsicum annum-derived capsanthin may help alleviate symptoms of dry eyes. The study used a benzalkonium chloride pharmacokinetic (PK) dry eye model in Albino Wistar rats to replicate the dry eye effect induced by excessive digital screen use. The rats were then supplemented once daily with a branded capsanthin ingredient called CapsiClear, from Unibar Corporation (Houston, TX) for seven weeks, in three dose groups: low (1.03 mg/kg body weight), medium (2.53 mg/kg body weight) and high (4.22 mg/kg body weight). Researchers measured changes in intraocular pressure, tear break-up time and tear volume in subjects and compared them to control groups. They also analyzed and evaluated the inflammatory and antioxidant responses to capsanthin supplementation.

Results showed that all three doses significantly decreased intraocular pressure, increased tear break-up time and volume, and decreased corneal inflammation, leading to the stabilization of the rats’ ocular surface. Capsanthin supplementation also reduced oxidative stress by increasing serum antioxidant levels such as glutathione peroxidase, nitric oxide, and lactoferrin and inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. The treatment also significantly inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6), and pro-inflammatory mediator, matrix metalloproteinase-9 .

Reference

  1. Shanmugham V et al. “Capsanthin from Capsicum annum fruits exerts anti-glaucoma, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activity, and corneal pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression in a benzalkonium chloride-induced rat dry eye model.” Journal of Food Biochemistry, vol. 46, no. 10 (July 27, 2022), https://doi.org/10.1111/jfbc.14352