Ethical Naturals Launches Oregon Cranberry Extract

October 11, 2016

The new Cranberex is made from Oregon cranberries, which offer higher proanthocyanidin levels than cranberries grown in northeastern states, ENI says.

Ethical Naturals Inc. (ENI; San Anselmo, CA) is hoping to capitalize on the unstoppable cranberry craze with the launch of Cranberex, a standardized cranberry extract made from Oregon cranberries.

Roughly 90% of American cranberries come from northeastern states, ENI says, but Cranberex is instead made from cranberries grown in the “cool, coastal area of Oregon.” Those cranberries grow a darker red and boast higher levels of proanthocyanidins (PACs)-the polyphenols famed for their anti-adhesion action-than the northeastern berries, according to ENI. Research has indicated that the A-linked PACs found in cranberries may be effective in alleviating symptoms of urinary tract infections (UTIs) by disrupting adhesion of E. coli bacteria to the walls of the urinary tract.

ENI notes that it has used the popular BL-DMAC method for quantifying PAC content of its cranberry extract, offering validation that Cranberex contains 15% type-A PACs. That allows Cranberex to carry claims for supporting urinary tract health with its capability to deliver 36 mg of cranberry PACs per day in a 240 mg dose of Cranberex, according to ENI.

“The development of Cranberex has been a very positive experience for ENI as we took this product literally ‘from field to finished product,’ which was one of the original goals of our company,” explains Cal Bewicke, president of ENI. “The technical work supporting the BL-DMAC method continues to create significant advantages in the therapeutic application of cranberry extracts. We are pleased to be a part of that, to develop the attributes of the Oregon cranberry, and to see the strong positive response we’re getting to our work both within the U.S. and in Europe.”

 

Read more:

How Should We Market the Cranberry?

Cranberry Plus Probiotic Tackles First Gummy

New Frontiers for Cranberry

 

Michael Crane
Associate Editor
Nutritional Outlook Magazine
michael.crane@ubm.com