SDA Soybean Oil Increases Omega-3 Levels in Overweight Subjects

September 23, 2010

Soybean oil enriched with stearidonic acid (SDA) can raise levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in the blood, according to research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Soybean oil enriched with stearidonic acid (SDA) can raise levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in the blood, according to research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Funded by Monsanto Co. (St. Louis) and Solae Co. (St. Louis), the study tested the effects of genetically-modified, SDA-enriched soybean oil on omega-3 blood levels in 52 overweight subjects over 12 weeks. In the randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study, subjects were assigned to one of three treatments, daily: 1 g of encapsulated soybean oil and 14.7 g liquid soybean oil mixed into food (control group), 1 g of encapsulated EPA and 14.7 g of liquid soybean oil (EPA group), or 1 g encapsulated soybean oil and 14.7 g liquid SDA-enriched soybean oil. The SDA-enriched soybean oil contained 4.2 g of SDA.

At baseline, mean omega-3 indexes were similar for the control, EPA, and SDA groups; but, after 12 weeks, indexes shifted in favor of the omega-3 groups with mean indexes of 4.15, 4.84, and 4.69, respectively. No adverse health effects were related to SDA.

Results of the study led researchers to conclude that the SDA-enriched soybean oil is 'a sustainable approach to increasing tissue concentration of long-chain polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids.'

To read the study abstract, click here.