Polyphenolic extract of hibiscus flower and lemon verbena leaf supports blood pressure, says recent study

A recently published study found that supplementation with a polyphenolic extract of hibiscus flower and lemon verbena leaf, called MetabolAid helped reduce blood pressure in prehypertensive and type 1 hypertensive subjects.

A recent study published in Molecules1, found that supplementation with a polyphenolic extract of hibiscus flower and lemon verbena leaf, called MetabolAid (from Monteloeder USA Inc., Miami, FL) helped reduce blood pressure in prehypertensive and type 1 hypertensive subjects. In the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 80 subjects were given either 500 mg of the extract or placebo for 84 days. Blood pressure measurements were taken at baseline, day 14, day 56, and day 84.

Results showed that supplementation significantly reduced systolic blood pressure at day 56, while diastolic blood pressure remained stable between both groups. The researchers attribute the reduction in systolic blood pressure to the vasodilator capacity of certain polyphenols. For example, the researchers explain that “research has shown that [hibiscus] contains a compound that causes nitric oxide release from the vascular endothelium followed by kidney filtration increase, a mechanism that hibiscus flower and lemon verbena leaf extracts.”

“We are extremely encouraged by the results of this study and the expanded scientific evidence for the use of Metabolaid in support of cardiovascular health, and its potential role in helping to reduce the incidence of high blood pressure worldwide,” said Jonathan Jones, chief scientific officer at Monteloeder, in a press release. “This represents a significant milestone in our ongoing commitment to science, innovation, and evidence-based ingredients.”

Reference

  1. Marhuenda J et al. “A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of a polyphenolic extract (Hibiscus sabdariffa and Lippia citriodora) for reducing blood pressure in prehypertensive and type 1 hypertensive subjects.” Molecules, vol. 26, no. 6 (2021): 1783