American Public Health Association Supports 75% Salt Reduction in Food Supply

November 14, 2011

The organization has voted in favor of a resolution urging FDA to meet its proposed goal within ten years.

The American Public Health Association (APHA; Washington, DC) is calling for a reduction of sodium in the U.S. food supply by 75%, according to reports from the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI; Washington, DC).

CSPI reports that, at APHAs’ 139th annual meeting, AHPA voted in favor of a resolution urging FDA to meet its proposed goal within ten years. The resolution also asks FDA to “remove or modify” salt’s current GRAS status, which allows the ingredient to avoid a maximum level in prepared foods.

AHPA’s resolution also supports a daily recommendation of sodium intake at no more than 1500 mg per day-a figure that was endorsed by the American Heart Association in 2010.

“According to the government’s dietary advice, only people with hypertension, people who are middle-aged and older, and African Americans should consume no more than 1500 mg of sodium daily,” said CSPI in a press release. “People in those groups represent about 70% of adults. The rest should consume no more than 2300 mg of sodium per day, about a teaspoon of salt. However, Americans are consuming close to 4000 mg of sodium per day-an amount that ‘far exceeds current recommendations and physiologic need,’ according to the APHA resolution.”

FDA was reportedly scheduled to hold a public meeting on sodium on November 10.

The APHA resolution on salt reduction can be downloaded here.

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