Aker Awaits Non-GMO Krill Certification

June 17, 2014

On product labels, non-GMO status should pair nicely with Marine Stewardship Council certification.

As part of its mission towards 100% product traceability, krill oil supplier Aker BioMarine Antarctic US Inc. (Issaquah, WA) has applied for non-GMO status with the Non-GMO Project. The company’s application is pending approval, but a result could come as early as next month.

“We want people to really understand what this ingredient is from start to finish,” says Becky Wright, Aker’s communication manager. “Consumers and manufacturers really needs to start asking the questions about traceability, like where is my fish oil or krill oil coming from? What species of fish are in my oil?”

Even though GMO status is already a concern with fish products, Wright says few fish oil and krill oil dietary supplements are promoting non-GMO status. One exception is New Chapter’s Wholemega fish oil supplement. If Aker successfully obtains non-GMO status, manufacturers of Superba krill oil products will be that much closer to having verified non-GMO krill supplements.

“While non-GMO status is already a huge trend in food, at the moment the trend is really trickling down to dietary supplements in a big way,” says Wright. “In fact, for the Non-GMO project, I think it’s one of their fastest growing segments.” The Non-GMO Project even has a running list of non-GMO supplements and ingredients that bear its stamp of quality.

For Aker, non-GMO status would be just one of its several accomplishments in 2014. The company just announced plans to open a new manufacturing facility in Houston. Instead of performing oil extractions in Valencia, Spain, Aker will be able to send its Antarctic krill straight to the United States for local extraction before shipment. “Made in USA” claims may then become possible.

 

Robby Gardner

Associate Editor

Nutritional Outlook magazine

robby.gardner@ubm.com