Toxicity Study Affirms Safety of Caralluma Fimbriata Satiety Ingredient

July 11, 2013

The six-month, chronic, oral toxicity rat study found no deaths or treatment-related toxicities of Caralluma fimbriata at three doses.

Herbal appetite-suppressant ingredient Caralluma fimbriata presented no toxicity concerns in a study recently published in the International Journal of Toxicology.

The six-month, chronic, oral toxicity rat study found no deaths or treatment-related toxicities of Caralluma fimbriata at three doses: 100, 300, and 1000 mg/kg body weight. The studies performed included two in vitro genotoxicity assays; a repeated-dose oral toxicity study; and a prenatal developmental study during which no external, visceral, or skeletal fetal abnormalities were observed up to the maximum dose tested.

“Together with its scientifically validated ability to reduce fat and suppress appetite, Caralluma fimbriata offers both safety and efficacy,” said Paul Clayton, PhD, chief scientific advisor at Gencor, an India-based ingredients supplier that supplies its Slimaluma brand of Caralluma fimbriata. The company says that two previous double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials found statistically significant decreases in waist circumference in experimental groups taking Caralluma fimbriata compared to placebo groups. Gencor’s Slimaluma is GRAS affirmed, kosher, halal, and can be supplied certified organic.

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