Study: Majority of Orthopedic Surgery Patients Found Insufficient in Vitamin D

October 13, 2010

Researchers at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City measured the vitamin D levels of 723 subjects scheduled for orthopedic surgery.

Researchers at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City measured the vitamin D levels of 723 subjects scheduled for orthopedic surgery and found more evidence that vitamin D deficiency is a serious concern in the United States.

The results have been published in the October 6 issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

All patients were scheduled for surgery between Jan 2007 and March 2008. Vitamin D levels were measured before surgery and characterized as “normal,” “insufficient” or “deficient.”

Results indicated that 83% of the subjects failed to meet sufficient vitamin D levels (equal to or greater than 32 ng/ml). Of this group, 43% had insufficient vitamin D levels (under 32 ng/ml) and 40% had deficient levels (under 20 ng/ml).

Some other findings from the study were deemed worth noting. Patients over 50 years old were 35% less likely to be deficient compared to patients between 18 and 50 years old. Additionally, subjects with darker skin tones (e.g. blacks and Hispanics) were considered 5.5 times more likely to have low vitamin D levels when compared to subjects with lighter skin tones (e.g. whites and Asians).

To read the full study abstract, click here.