ProbioKid Probiotic Ingredient for Young Children Recognized Safe in U.S., Canada

June 9, 2017

Lallemand Health Solutions announced that its ProbioKid probiotic formula is now Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) in the United States and Canada.

Lallemand Health Solutions (Montreal) announced that its ProbioKid probiotic formula for young children is now recognized as safe in both the United States and Canada. In the United States, ProbioKid is now Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) for infants and children in food and beverage products, including infant formula. Meanwhile, in Canada, Health Canada has extended a previously approved immune-health claim for ProbioKid under Natural Products Number 800199993. The claim, which states “Helps to reinforce the body’s natural defenses in children,” had applied to infants over the age of six months but has now also been approved for infants over the age of three months. Lallemand says this expanded approval is the result of additional safety studies conducted by the company.  ProbioKid comprises three of Lallemand’s proprietary probiotic strains: Lactobacillus helveticus Rosell-52, for balancing microbiota and helping to prevent intestinal infections; Bifidobacterium infantis Rosell-33; and Bifidobacterium bifidum Rosell-71, which helps modulate non-specific immune diseases.  Solange Henoud, Lallemand’s regulatory affairs director, commented in a press release: “Not only are these achievements…key for the North American markets but they also can be seen as a global recognition of our strains safety in babies, being a vulnerable population. In their opinion report, the scientific experts mentioned that ‘other qualified and competent scientists reviewing the same publicly available information would reach the same conclusion.’”  According to a press release, Lallemand’s ProbioKid probiotic formula has been available on the market around the world for 15 years under different names and is popular in countries such as China.   Also read:  Probiotoc BLIS K12 Defends Against Variety of Oral Infections In Children, Study Suggests 2016 Probiotic Research Update