New White Paper on Longvida Curcumin Reveals Possible Cognitive Benefits

October 12, 2011

The company says that results from the 30-day trial showed that a single capsule of Longvida (80 mg curcumin) significantly improved a number of markers.

A new white paper available on Verdure Sciences’ (Noblesville, IN) website covers new clinical data from a study performed by Ohio State University on Verdure’s Longvida optimized curcumin ingredient.

The company says that results from the 30-day placebo-controlled randomized controlled trial showed that a single capsule of Longvida (80 mg curcumin) significantly improved a number of markers, including plasma amyloid-beta, a polypeptide believed to play a significant part in healthy brain aging and which starts accumulating during middle age. In addition, the study showed Longvida’s effects on a range of inflammatory and oxidative markers.

“I think what was interesting about this study is that we saw a number of effects, not just one thing,” stated Robert DiSilvestro, PhD, professor at Ohio State’s department of human nutrition, who performed the study. “The kinds of effects we saw for the intervention could conceivably help people of different ages and health status.”

He added, “We looked at beta-amyloid protein, which is thought to be involved with aging and possibly Alzheimer’s disease. We found that it was actually lowered a little bit with Longvida. The effect was not tremendously large, but it was statistically significant and I think important because we gave such a small dose for a relatively short time.”

Verdure’s technical director, Blake Ebersole, added, “To our knowledge, this is one of the first human clinical trials on curcumin to show statistically significant effects on clinical endpoints in a healthy population. The fact that such a low dose was needed to achieve effects in only 30 days is an interesting and unique finding as well…These findings are consistent with previous data from several major universitites suggesting that beta-amyloid can be bound by curcumin and may be cleared from the brain.”

The company adds that the study is slated for publication in an international peer-reviewed medical journal.

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