New review of research explores potential antiviral benefits of curcumin

June 5, 2020

Based on existing data from in silico and animal studies on curcumin and viral infection, the review serves as a groundwork for future study of curcumin as a possible treatment. 

A new review1 co-authored by Sabinsa (East Windsor, NJ) founder Muhammed Majeed, PhD, explores the potential effects of curcumin on COVID-19 infection. Based on existing data from in silico and animal studies on curcumin and viral infection, the review serves as a groundwork for future study of curcumin as a possible treatment.

The review cites studies that point to curcumin’s ability to potentially inhibit the entry of virus to the cell, inhibit encapsulation of the virus and viral protease, as well as modulate various cellular signaling pathways. The review also cites studies in which curcumin was effective in pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis, and edema, as well as the recuperative actions of curcumin on cardiac and kidney damage caused by viral infections. Despite the potential benefits and safety profile, the review does acknowledge that curcumin’s poor bioavailability may pose a challenge.

“We are pleased to see this meaningful assemblage of the relevant work on curcumin published at a time when prevention and strong immunity is on the minds of people around the world,” said Majeed, in a press release. “While the world anxiously awaits a permanent solution to this pandemic, it’s helpful to understand how safe herbal compounds like curcumin can support healthy immune function.”

References:

1. Zahedipour F et al. “Potential effects of curcumin in the treatment of COVID‐19 infection.” Phytotherapy Research, Published online ahead of print on May 17, 2020