Meta-Analysis: Leafy Greens May Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

September 22, 2010

Increased consumption of leafy green vegetables has been linked to a 14% reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, according to the results of a meta-analysis published in the British Medical Journal.

Increased consumption of leafy green vegetables has been linked to a 14% reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, according to the results of a meta-analysis published in the British Medical Journal.

Researchers at the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom calculated data from six long-term studies that reviewed type 2 diabetes incidence with fruit and vegetable intake. The six studies were conducted for a median of 13.4 years, with over 220,000 subjects (from 30 to 74 years old) included in the data.

Four of the studies included leafy green intake as a measure and just two included men.

In summarizing all of the data, researchers concluded that 1.35 servings of leafy greens, compared to 0.2 servings, resulted in the 14% risk reduction. No risk improvement was identified in connection with overall fruit, vegetable, or fruit and vegetable intake.

Funded for the study was provided by the cardiovascular research department of the University of Leicester.

To read the full study, visit the British Medical Journal.

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