Citicoline Study Shows Improved Mental Focus

July 1, 2011

Research presented at the annual meeting of the New Clinical Drug Evaluation Unit provides further support for the theory that citicoline can improve mental focus in humans.

Research presented at the annual meeting of the New Clinical Drug Evaluation Unit (NCDEU) provides further support for the theory that citicoline can improve mental focus in humans. The NCDEU is a scientific meeting of academics and industry for innovative approaches to mental health intervention.

In a random controlled trial, researchers from the University of Utah Brain Institute assigned 60 adult women (40 to 60 years old) to 250 mg or 500 mg of citicoline, or placebo. Kyowa Hakko U.S.A. (New York City) provided its Cognizin brand citicoline for the study.

Both citicoline groups produced fewer errors when subjects were assigned to performance testing.

“Our findings suggest that citicoline may mitigate the cognitive decline associated with normal aging and improve attentional deficits associated with overstimulation of the brain,” said Deborah Turgelun-Todd, PhD, director of the cognitive neuroimaging laboratory at the Brain Institute. “Citicoline’s ability to improve attention and focus is exciting because it can help anyone who wants to improve their focus-from scientists to soccer moms.”

The Brain Institute’s Erin McGlade, PhD, received a new investigator award at the conference for her work on the study.

Cognizin citicoline is available as a supplement or functional beverage. Kyowa Hakko U.S.A. states that it is able to cross the human body’s blood-brain barrier to deliver citicoline to the body.