AHPA Issues Members New DMAA Rule

August 12, 2011

Beginning January 13, 2012, AHPA members may not label the ingredient DMAA as "geranium oil" or as being any part of the geranium plant.

The American Herbal Products Association’s (AHPA; Silver Spring, MD) Board of Trustees has issued a trade requirement to AHPA members regarding labeling of products containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine, also known as DMAA. Beginning January 13, 2012, AHPA members may not label the ingredient DMAA as “geranium oil” or as being any part of the geranium plant (e.g. “geranium oil,” “geranium stem,” “geranium extract”), either by common or botanical name. However, the requirement does not prevent the “geranium” labeling of any compound that is in fact derived from geranium plant materials.

DMAA was an inhaled nasal-decongestant drug by Eli Lilly in 1971, known as Forthane, and it has been used in weight-loss and bodybuilding dietary supplements. The association says it is still reviewing evidence to determine whether DMAA is in fact a constituent of the geranium species Pelargonium spp.

“There are no known-published reports indicating that [DMAA] is a natural product,” stated Steven Dentali, PhD, AHPA’s chief science officer. “Any labeling stating that it is naturally occurring in geranium, or any other natural source, would need appropriate scientific evidence to support it.”