Up to 68% of U.S. Consumers Use Dietary Supplements, CRN Survey Finds

October 5, 2012

U.S. dietary supplements usage rose slightly, according to CRN's 2012 survey.

U.S. dietary supplements usage rose slightly, according to a 2012 survey commissioned by the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN; Washington, DC). The dietary supplement association reported the survey results at its 2012 CRN Workshop & Conference in October.

An estimated 68% of U.S. consumers are dietary supplement users, according to the report, representing a slight uptick in usage year after year since 2005, when that figure was 64%.

“Year after year, our survey demonstrates that a sizeable portion of the American population values vitamins and other supplements as part of the things they do to maintain good health,” said Judy Blatman, senior vice president, communications, CRN. “From a publicity-generating standpoint, it would be interesting to see huge swings; but from a healthy industry perspective, it’s encouraging that two-thirds of adult consumers in this country continue to identify themselves as supplement customers, year after year.”

Women and older adults appear to be the most likely users of dietary supplements. The likeliest dietary supplements that users are purchasing include multivitamins (76%), omega-3/fish oil (30%), vitamin D (29%), calcium (25%), vitamin C (27%), B vitamins (20%), and vitamin E (13%).

“While the multivitamin remains incredibly popular with a majority of Americans, consumer usage is not limited to the multi, or even just to vitamins,” said Ms. Blatman. “Thirty-three percent report taking specialty supplements, 16% take sports nutrition supplements, and 18% take herbals/botanicals.”

Consumer confidence in the safety, quality, and efficacy of dietary supplements also remained steady, the report states, with 85% of American adults in 2012 indicating that they are confident in these supplement qualities. CRN says that U.S. consumer confidence in supplements has in fact remained fairly consistent over the last several year, according to its survey.

CRN commissioned survey-based market research group Ipsos Public Affairs to survey a national sample of over 2000 adults who provided extensive details about their frequency of use and also choice of dietary supplements.

Available for CRN members to purchase now, the extensive report includes over 3000 pages of data tables on U.S. dietary supplement usage, classified by the ingredient, channel of distribution, geographic location, household income, and so much more. To purchase the full market survey, contact CRN.