Sabinsa’s Probiotic, Cranberry, and Fenugreek Synbiotic Combinations Support Digestive Health in Two New Studies

Jun 28, 2018

Two new studies indicate that cranberry seed fiber and fenugreek are effective prebiotics when combined with Sabinsa’s (East Windsor, NJ) Bacillus coagulans MTCC 5856 probiotic strain. Together, these synbiotic formulations may boost digestive health. The studies found that cranberry seed fiber and fenugreek were able to resist gastric acid and pancreatic enzyme hydrolysis, as well as support the growth of probiotic bacteria B. coagulans MTCC 5856, the strain featured in Sabinsa’s LactoCran and LactoWise branded ingredients. Both of the studies were conducted by Sabinsa.

In the cranberry seed fiber study,1 which was published in the International Journal of Food Science and Technology, researchers sought to further explore the mechanism by which cranberry fruit might act as a prebiotic for B. coagulans MTCC 5856. In the in vitro study, which mimicked in vivo conditions, the researchers sought to establish the prebiotic potential of cranberry seed fiber from cranberry supplier Fruit d’Or (Villeroy, QC, Canada), and its fermentability by B. coagulans MTCC 5856.

In the study, the authors wrote that cranberry is known to contain bioactive compounds that may help to prevent urinary tract infections, stomach ulcers, lipoprotein oxidation, cardiovascular disease, and more. However, they added, cranberry seed fiber has not been fully explored for its prebiotic potential. The researchers dissolved cranberry seed fiber in a sterile electrolyte solution containing lysozyme and pepsin to simulate a gastric acid environment. They determined enzymatic hydrolysis by dissolving pancreatin from porcine in a phosphate buffer containing bile salt. The researchers collected and analyzed samples at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 minutes. Cranberry seed fiber was found to be resistant to gastric acid, and non-digestible to pancreatic enzyme hydrolysis.

According to the authors, fermentation of prebiotic fiber by the probiotic is also “an important aspect for determination of prebiotic activity of a probiotic fiber.” Thus, in the current cranberry seed fiber study, the authors evaluated the fermentation of the cranberry seed fiber by growing of B. coagulans MTCC 5856 in an aerobic environment. The researchers observed a significant amount of short-chain fatty acids produced by B. coagulans MTCC 5856 while fermenting the cranberry seed fibers anaerobically. The cranberry seed fiber supported the growth of B. coagulans MTCC 5856 while also inhibiting the growth of E. coli. The study authors write that the results provide evidence for “cranberry seed fiber as a prebiotic fiber and also its suitability with the probiotic B. coagulans MTCC 5856 for an ideal synbiotic preparation.”

Then, in the fenugreek study,2 which was published in Food Science and Nutrition, researchers evaluated the potential of a galactomannan extracted from fenugreek seeds (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) as a prebiotic fiber, as well as its fermentation by B. coagulans MTCC 5856. As in the cranberry seed fiber study, this study was conducted in an in vitro model mimicking in vivo conditions. The researchers dissolved 2 g of galactomannan from fenugreek seeds in a sterile electrolyte solution containing lysozyme and pepsin to determine gastric acid hydrolysis. In order to determine enzymatic hydrolysis, the researchers dissolved pancreatin from porcine pancreas in a phosphate buffer. Galactomannan from fenugreek seeds was dissolved in the same pancreatic solution. The study authors collected and analyzed samples at 0, 30, 60 90, 120, and 180 minutes.

To determine fenugreek’s fermentation by B. coagulans MTCC 5856, researchers inoculated a single colony of B. coagulans MTCC 5856 and incubated it overnight. The researchers found that B. coagulans MTCC 5856 produced short-chain fatty acids while fermenting the galactomannan. In a press statement from Sabinsa, the company pointed out that these short-chain fatty acids are important for colon health and also have anti-carcinogenic as well as anti-inflammatory properties. Galactomannan from fenugreek demonstrated prebiotic activity, the authors, wrote, and is suitable with B. coagulans MTCC 5856 in a synbiotic combination. In addition, B. coagulans MTCC 5856 also inhibited the growth of E. coli when co-cultured with galactomannan.

Taken together, the results from both studies demonstrate that cranberry and fenugreek are ideal ingredients to pair with B. coagulans MTCC 5856 in a synbiotic combination.

Shaheen Majeed, president, Sabinsa Worldwide, commented on the study results in the press statement: “We certainly recognize the growing need in the marketplace for proper prebiotics, and with Sabinsa’s understanding of probiotics, we feel the marriage of both is of prime importance to one’s health. These preliminary studies help set the stage for demonstrating such health benefits.”

 

 

Also read: 

Sabinsa Sponsoring Probiotics for Digestive Health Seminar at SupplySide China

New Frontiers for Cranberry

Can Polyphenols Serve as Prebiotics?

Disclosures: 

1. Majeed M et al., “Cranberry seed fibre: a promising prebiotic fibre and its fermentation by the probiotic Bacillus coagulans MTCC 5856,” International Journal of Food Science and Technology. Published online February 17, 2018.

2. Majeed M et al., “Galactomannan from Trigonella foenum-graecum L. seed: prebiotic application and its fermentation by the probiotic Bacillus coagulans strain MTCC 5856,” Food Science and Nutrition. Published online February 20, 2018.