Non-animal chondroitin sulfate shows efficacy at a lower dosage, says recent study

September 13, 2019

A pilot study recently published in Nutrients1 demonstrated the efficacy of non-animal chondroitin sulfate (CS). In the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study, 60 overweight subjects with knee osteoarthritis were given either 600 mg of the branded non-animal CS Mythocondro (manufactured by Gnosis by Lesaffre; Milan, Italy), or placebo for 12 weeks. Assessment of knee pain, quality of life, related inflammation markers and body composition were performed at baseline, week 4, and week 12.

Recovery of knee functions and ability was measured using the Tegner Lysholm Knee Scoring (TLKS) scale, and pain was measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis (WOMAC) index. Results showed that compared to placebo, subjects taking the non-animal CS had significant increases in the TLKS scores, representing improved articular functions, and significant decreases in WOMAC scores after 12 weeks, representing decreases in the level of pain. Measures of inflammation also improved, with significant reductions in erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the non-animal CS group, compared to placebo.

“Mythocondro is the long-awaited chondroitin sulfate of the joint supplements industry,” said Silvia Pisoni, marketing manager of Gnosis by Lesaffre, in a press release. “At the dose of 600 mg/day instead of the current suggested 1200 mg/day, [Mythocondro] offers a once-a-day alternative to larger chondroitin sulfate pills that need to be taken two times a day. Since the population ages across the world, and more and more people need specific supplements to support the natural aging process of their bones and joints, Mythocondro, working as a chondroprotective bioactive (macro)molecule, can provide great results in the early stages of OA, in order to delay progress and/or to reduce symptoms.”

The vegetarian CS is obtained through a patented fermentation-based manufacturing process, and holds GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status. 
 

References: 

1. Rondanelli M. et al. “Effectiveness of non-animal chondroitin sulfate supplementation in the treatment of moderate knee osteoarthritis in a group of overweight subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study.” Nutrients, vol. 11, no. 9 (2019): 2027